The Truth About Human Trafficking & the Wall

President Trump has made many misleading and uninformed claims as he advocates for a wall at the southern border. We thought you should know the truth about modern-day slavery.

Watch on CNN: Lori Cohen, Director of Sanctuary’s Anti-Trafficking Initiative, respond to President Trump’s statements: https://cnn.it/2TjrAZp 


Over the past weeks, President Trump has repeatedly brought up human trafficking as he argues in favor of building a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. The majority of his statements on the subject, however, have been either misleading or unfounded.

At Sanctuary for Families, we know from our clients’ experiences and from fellow anti-trafficking experts across the country that the reality of modern-day slavery is different from that described by the President. For this reason, we’re debunking five of the President’s most frequent claims about human trafficking:

1. Trump’s Claim: Human trafficking cannot be stopped without a steel barrier or concrete wall.

Many women and children attempting to cross the border are fleeing sexual violence and trafficking in their own countries, and seeking asylum in the U.S. — Shutting them out of our country makes them more vulnerable to exploitation.


2. Building a wall at the border will keep traffickers out of the United States.

Many U.S. citizens are involved in the sex trade and traffickers entering the U.S. through the southern border often do so lawfully.


3. Stricter immigration policies and tighter border security will stop human trafficking.

In the U.S., immigrants — particularly those who are undocumented — are at a much higher risk of exploitation than nonimmigrants.

By criminalizing immigrant communities, President Trump’s policies are pushing trafficking survivors deeper into the shadows and limiting law enforcement’s ability to investigate trafficking-related crimes.


4. Undocumented immigrants are criminals and bring violence to our communities.

Studies have shown that undocumented immigrants are considerably less likely to commit crimes compared to U.S.-born citizens.

In reality, most undocumented people crossing the southern border are fleeing horrific violence, including gender violence and sex trafficking, in their home countries.


5. Trafficking victims are immigrants from other countries who have been brought here unlawfully.

A very large number of victims of trafficking and sexual exploitation in this country are U.S. citizens and never cross any borders at all.


Building the wall will not stop human trafficking. If President Trump really wanted to protect trafficking victims, he would listen to experts, push for the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and increase the number of available T visas.

 

Gender Violence Survivors Seeking Asylum Need Our Protection

Last week, President Trump addressed the nation to warn of “a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border.” His administration’s rhetoric and immigration policies are endangering the lives of survivors of gender violence. Read our statement.

On Tuesday night, President Trump used his address to the nation to argue for a border wall that he says will make our nation safer. Sanctuary for Families believes that the President’s statement failed to address the deep-rooted issues in our immigration system and instead, focused on policies that would further harm and endanger refugees and other vulnerable immigrants, including survivors of gender-based violence.

At Sanctuary, we work with gender violence survivors, 70% of whom are immigrants. Many are seeking asylum due to extreme intimate partner violence, female genital mutilation (FGM), and/or death threats they experienced in their home countries. Some have been tricked or forced into the U.S. by traffickers. Some come directly to New York. Others have been detained at the U.S.-Mexico border, itself dangerous and re-traumatizing, and eventually, make it to New York where organizations like Sanctuary can help.

For those currently stuck on the Mexican side of the border, however, the consequences can be deadly. Due to the Administration’s new metering system, thousands of adults and children, most of whom are seeking asylum, will have to wait weeks, even months, before making their plea for protection in the U.S. Sleeping on streets or in over-crowded migrant shelters, their desperation and fear only increase, and they become more vulnerable to the kind of violence they fled in the first place.

To be clear, seeking asylum at any of our borders is not illegal. Turning asylum seekers away, however, is a cruel violation of international law. We need policies that protect survivors of gender violence seeking refuge within our borders and provide clear pathways to legal status, not ones that scapegoat immigrant communities and use their lives as political tools. To these ends, Sanctuary is taking action.

Every day, Sanctuary provides free high-quality legal representation to ensure that immigrant gender violence survivors receive the committed advocacy they need to present their best case for immigration status. Here in New York, we advocate for State legislation to better protect our immigrant communities and deepen our partnerships with fellow immigration agencies. Across the country, we partner with advocates to push for a functional immigration system and rational border policy.

For over 30 years, Sanctuary has served survivors of gender violence regardless of immigration status. As we enter the New Year, we reaffirm our long-held commitment to our immigrant communities both here in New York and across the border. Thank you for standing with us.

Warmly,

Hon. Judy H. Kluger
Executive Director, Sanctuary for Families

 

A Call to Reject the Proposed Public Charge Rule

As the end of the public comment period approaches, we invite you to learn about the severity of the changes to the Public Charge rule and urge you to submit comments to DHS by December 10, 2018.

Sonia Mansoor is Manager of Public Benefits Legal Advocacy and Nabah Ikram is the Immigration Specialist at Sanctuary’s Immigration Intervention Project. They are co-chairs of Sanctuary’s Public Charge Advocacy Subcommittee. 

Sanctuary for Families stands with immigrant survivors of violence in condemning the proposed changes to the “Public Charge” doctrine that will detrimentally impact the well-being and health of vulnerable communities including children, pregnant women, and the elderly.

As the public comment period ends tonight, we invite you to learn about the severity of these changes and urge you to join us in preventing the implementation of this heartless rule by submitting comments to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) today.

WHAT IS PUBLIC CHARGE?

To enter the United States or to obtain lawful permanent residence, certain noncitizens have to demonstrate that they are unlikely to become a “public charge,” which currently refers to someone who is “primarily dependent on the government for subsistence.” On October 10, 2018, however, DHS published new provisions that broaden this definition to “someone who receives one or more public benefits.”

Currently, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can deny adjustment to Legal Permanent Resident Status or admission to the United States to individuals who have received public cash assistance or institutionalization for long term care. Under these proposed changes, USCIS will also consider participation in the following programs in a public charge determination:

  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
  • Non-emergency Medicaid
  • Low-income subsidies under Medicare Part D
  • Housing choice vouchers, project-based subsidies, and public housing ­­­­

The proposed regulation also adds criteria to the “totality of circumstances” evaluated in each determination and changes the weights attributed to certain “positive” and “negative” factors. Among the heavily-weighted negative factors are current or recent unemployment, current receipt of public benefits, and a lack of unsubsidized health insurance.

HOW DO THESE CHANGES IN THE PUBLIC CHARGE RULE RELATE TO ISSUES OF GENDER VIOLENCE?

While there are important exceptions to the proposed rule – including refugees, asylum applicants, victims of domestic violence and other serious crimes, VAWA self-petitioners, special immigrant juveniles –  there is no guarantee that such exceptions will provide sufficient protection to vulnerable communities. At Sanctuary, we are seeing that a significant number of survivors of domestic violence and sex trafficking, confused by the new rule’s language and its arbitrary standards, are already cancelling critical public assistance benefits to which they may be legally entitled.

Lori Adams, Director of Sanctuary’s Immigration Intervention Project (IIP), explained the risks that this new regulation poses to immigrant survivors and their families:

Poverty and homelessness are the high prices that many immigrant survivors of gender-based violence pay to escape abuse. At Sanctuary for Families, we see this firsthand with our clients, over 75% of whom are immigrants. Many survivors, often with small children, are afraid of being forced to return to dangerous and abusive situations due to lack of resources. The fear is that the Administration’s proposed “public charge” rule will discourage them from applying for public benefits and housing assistance.  They may, consequently, be faced with an impossible choice, between feeding their children or pursuing immigration status that could save their lives.

JOIN US IN TAKING ACTION NOW!

Sanctuary is committed to pushing back against the incremental erosion of the rights of immigrant survivors seeking protection in this country. Our Public Charge Advocacy Committee has been working with Cohen & Gresser LLP in developing desk aids and flyers for our clients and staff members that clarify whether someone of a particular immigration status would be deemed a public charge. Furthermore, the firm Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP drafted Sanctuary’s official comments on the Public Charge Rule for submission to the DHS.

Finally, our Survivor Leaders and staff members drafted and submitted individual and department-specific comments after being trained by members of Sanctuary’s Public Charge Advocacy Committee. Below are some of the comments our Survivor Leaders submitted to the DHS:

Submitter: Anonymous

I am a legal resident alien originally from the Dominican Republic. I am currently on disability benefits because of bipolar disorder. Previous to my status of disability I have worked since I was in Junior High School. Also, though I am not working at the moment, I am an active member of my church where I volunteer many hours. Also, I volunteer in my community helping fellow tenants understand their rights to prevent homelessness. Lastly, I am a mentor at Sanctuary for Families, a non-profit organization, and educate the community on domestic violence.

To assume that because a person has a need today that they will be forever a charge on the system is short sighted. Although I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1992 and am a survivor of domestic violence I have managed to raise two independent women. My oldest daughter graduated from George School and Haverford College; she also has a Master’s Degree from Middlebury College. My youngest daughter, who quit college (she was working on a Bachelors in Engineering at Syracuse University) has a good job in the retail industry.

I suspect that there are many people who are applying for entry to this country that fit this profile. I urge you to reconsider this decision especially in this country made by immigrants. Ultimately, the United States is the one that’s going to suffer as immigrants bring fresh ideas. Einstein was an immigrant! Remember him? Please remove this regulation.

Submitter: Guadalupe

I recommend the department security please take a moment and thinking about these families who receive some public assistance.

I am a mother of 3 children and work every day to clean houses and the food stamps help to have food on my table. My 2 older children was in the college and that benefit help me for they went to the college. If I did not take the benefit my children did not got the education because they needs to work and help me to pay the bills for my house.

This is not only my history. We are many families and work every day but the bills are so expensive in New York.

Please thinking about this families, Medicaid help to families for health care, and the other benefits is for food of the children.

Submitter: Deyanira

In my opinion the proposed regulation will hurt a lot of families because the people who apply for public assistance are low income and are in poverty. I work with the community and I know them. There are so many people who are immigrants and they didn’t apply for public benefits for themselves, but for their children. I work with Mixteca community, Neighborhood Advisory Board (NAB), Parent Teacher Association (PTA) President, Community Education Council (CEC) of District 14, and also I am a Survivor Leader for Sanctuary for Families. I will be affected because I do not have any immigration status.

The public comment period is about to end, but you can still take action and help protect the rights of survivors of gender violence and their families. Submit a comment requesting the DHS to withdraw the proposed “Inadmissibility on public charge grounds” rule here: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=USCIS-2010-0012-0001

6 ways Survivor Leaders raised awareness about domestic violence this October

Survivors marched, trained, tabled and more in an effort to educate their communities about abuse during Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

The fall can be a hectic time but every year, October presents an unique opportunity for survivors and advocates to bring the issue of domestic violence to the forefront of the public’s attention. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and to say the women is Sanctuary’s Survivor Leadership Program were busy, would be an understatement.

See the many ways these survivors worked to educate their communities this past month and learn more about Sanctuary’s Survivor Leadership Program.

1. Marching in the Brides’ March

 

Survivor Leaders marched in the Eighteenth Annual Gladys Ricart and Victims of Domestic Violence Memorial Walk, more commonly known as the Brides’ March. Each year, survivors and community advocates march from Washington Heights, through the South Bronx and into Harlem in memory of Gladys Ricart, a Dominican woman from Washington Heights, who was murdered in New Jersey on September 26, 1999 by her abusive former boyfriend on the day she was to wed her fiancé.

2. Training fellow survivors

Sharing personal experiences of abuse can be extremely challenging. Through our Survivor Leadership Program, these women have learned how share their stories in a way that is safe and empowering for them and informs those they’re speaking to about the various forms of abuse. Last month, these Survivor Leaders led a Domestic Violence 101 training and instructed a group of survivors at the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic and Gender Based Violence on how to do the same.

3. Telling stories through dance

Through Sanctuary’s partnership with Gibney Dance, a number of survivors are exploring storytelling through movement and dance. The photo above was taken following night two of Cracks of Light, a special Domestic Violence Awareness Month performance that is hosted each year by Gibney.

4. Press Interviews

Escaping domestic violence is never easy, but for immigrant victims the challenges can be unique. Leticia spoke candidly with Telemundo in mid-October about her experience with abuse. Deputy Director of Sanctuary’s Legal Center, Linda Lopez, provided additional information and context about the U Visa and other forms of relief that are available to undocumented immigrant victims of gender violence.

Watch the interview (in Spanish) here. 

5. Tabling

Hospitals can be important points for intervention when it comes to domestic violence. Survivor Leaders passed out information on the signs of abuse and Sanctuary’s services to medical professionals and patients at the Kings County Hospital; reminding everyone that abuse can take many forms and that help is available.

6. Trainings

Survivor Leaders know that in order to effect change, we must engage everyone, especially those who control important levers of power. Kristin (center) trained New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (NYS DOCCS) employees on domestic violence, an experience that the vast majority of people in New York State prisons have in common.

About the Survivor Leadership Program

Recognizing the importance of advocacy in the healing process for many survivors and the value of survivor expertise in community engagement, Sanctuary first launched a leadership program for survivors back in 1998. This initiative, known as the Mentors Program, trained dozens of survivors to  use their experience as survivors to educate their communities, mentor other survivors, and become public speakers all while maintaining their safety and practicing self-care.

Last year, the Mentors Program was renamed the Survivor Leadership Program and in August, we brought on our first-ever Survivor Leadership Coordinator to manage the Survivor Leadership trainings, a growing and increasingly active alumni group, and all survivor leadership activity at Sanctuary.